Bloomsbury Books Ashland

Bloomsbury Books Ashland

290 E. Main St
Ashland, OR 97520
541-488-0029
bloomsburyashland
@gmail.com

OUR HOURS HAVE TEMPORARILY CHANGED

Open 7-days:
Mon-Sat 9am-6pm
Sun 10am-6pm

Home of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival
Specializing in contemporary fiction, children’s books, young adult, local authors, & a large Shakespeare & theater section

After shopping, enjoy your book at… Bloomsbury Blends
Organic eats, drinks, treats
Above Bloomsbury Books.
290 E. Main
(541) 708-0608

If you are interested in ordering a book or checking stock please email us at:

bbashlandorders@gmail.com

Thank you!

Dear customer,

The safety and health of our community is always of utmost importance to us. In the interest of public health and safety, we have made the decision to limit browsing in the store. We are requiring that you wear a mask at all times if you enter the store and are limiting the number of customers in the store at one time.

We are currently offering curbside pick-up if you are uncomfortable entering the store! How does that work? First and foremost – if you are showing signs of sickness, curbside pick-up is not for you! If you are unable or reluctant to leave your house at this time that’s okay too! Your best bet is to call us at 541-488-0029 and have your book mailed to you. If you are interested in curbside pick-up just email us at bbashlandorders@gmail.com to place an order.

We thank you for your continued support, stay safe out there.

Bloomsbury Staff

 

BLOOMSBURY PICKS FOR JUNE

ON JUNETEENTH
Annette Gordon-Reed
Weaving together American history, dramatic family chronicle, and searing episodes of memoir, Annette Gordon-Reed’s On Juneteenth provides a historian’s view of the country’s long road to Juneteenth, recounting both its origins in Texas and the enormous hardships that African-Americans have endured in the century since, from Reconstruction through Jim Crow and beyond. All too aware of the stories of cowboys, ranchers, and oilmen that have long dominated the lore of the Lone Star State, Gordon-Reed–herself a Texas native and the descendant of enslaved people brought to Texas as early as the 1820s–forges a new and profoundly truthful narrative of her home state, with implications for us all.

FACING THE MOUNTAIN
Daniel James Brown
They came from across the continent and Hawaii. Their parents taught them to embrace both their Japanese heritage and the ways of America. They faced bigotry, yet they believed in their bright futures as American citizens. But within days of Pearl Harbor, the FBI was ransacking their houses and locking up their fathers. And within months many would themselves be living behind barbed wire. Facing the Mountain is an unforgettable chronicle of war-time America and the battlefields of Europe. Based on Daniel James Brown’s extensive interviews with the families of the protagonists as well as deep archival research, it portrays the kaleidoscopic journey of four Japanese-American families and their sons, who volunteered for 442nd Regimental Combat Team and were deployed to France, Germany, and Italy, where they were asked to do the near impossible.

THE PREMONITION
Michael Lewis
Michael Lewis’s taut and brilliant nonfiction thriller pits a band of medical visionaries against the wall of ignorance that was the official response of the Trump administration to the outbreak of COVID-19. The characters you will meet in these pages are as fascinating as they are unexpected. A thirteen-year-old girl’s science project on transmission of an airborne pathogen develops into a very grown-up model of disease control. A local public-health officer uses her worm’s-eye view to see what the CDC misses, and reveals great truths about American society. A secret team of dissenting doctors have everything necessary to fight the pandemic: brilliant backgrounds, world-class labs, prior experience with the pandemic scares of bird flu and swine flu…everything, that is, except official permission to implement their work. Michael Lewis is not shy about calling these people heroes for their refusal to follow directives that they know to be based on misinformation and bad science. Even the internet, as crucial as it is to their exchange of ideas, poses a risk to them. They never know for sure who else might be listening in.

ZERO FAIL
Carol Leonnig
The Secret Service was born in 1865, in the wake of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, but its story begins in earnest in 1963, with the death of John F. Kennedy. Shocked into reform by its failure to protect the president on that fateful day in Dallas, this once-sleepy agency was radically transformed into an elite, highly trained unit that would redeem itself several times. But this reputation for courage and excellence would not last forever. By Barack Obama’s presidency, the once-proud Secret Service was running on fumes and beset by mistakes and alarming lapses in judgment. With Donald Trump’s arrival, a series of promised reforms were cast aside, as a president disdainful of public service instead abused the Secret Service to rack up political and personal gains. To explore these problems in the ranks, Leonnig interviewed dozens of current and former agents, government officials, and whistleblowers who put their jobs on the line to speak out about a hobbled agency that’s in desperate need of reform.

BLOOMSBURY PICKS FOR MAY

SEED TO DUST
Marc Hamer
In Seed to Dust, Marc Hamer paints a beautiful portrait of the garden that “belongs to everyone.” He describes a year in his life as a country gardener, with each chapter named for the month he’s in. As he works, he muses on the unusual folklores of his beloved plants. He observes the creatures who scurry and hide from his blade or rake. And he reflects on his own life: living homeless as a young man, his loving relationship with his wife and children, and–now–feeling the effects of old age on body and mind.

SECRETS OF HAPPINESS
Joan Silber
In Secrets of Happiness, Joan Silber masterfully tells the stories of seemingly disparate lives, revealing the surprising and subtle connections that link them to each other. Each chapter is narrated by a different character, and as they tell their respective stories, the ways in which their lives have intersected take shape with little shocks as well as touches of humor. Silber’s story ranges wide in setting – from New York to Thailand to Nepal and back – but her precise writing captures each character’s search for joy and contentment in the swirl of the world around them with deep empathy and humanity. – Diana

PROJECT HAIL MARY
Andy Weir
Ryland Grace is the sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission–and if he fails, humanity and the earth itself will perish. Except that right now, he doesn’t know that. He can’t even remember his own name, let alone the nature of his assignment or how to complete it. All he knows is that he’s been asleep for a very, very long time. And he’s just been awakened to find himself millions of miles from home, with nothing but two corpses for company. An irresistible interstellar adventure as only Andy Weir could deliver, Project Hail Mary is a tale of discovery, speculation, and survival to rival The Martian–while taking us to places it never dreamed of going.

FINDING THE MOTHER TREE
Suzanne Simard
Suzanne Simard is a pioneer on the frontier of plant communication and intelligence; she’s been compared to Rachel Carson, hailed as a scientist who conveys complex, technical ideas in a way that is dazzling and profound. Her work has influenced filmmakers (the Tree of Souls of James Cameron’s Avatar) and her TED talks have been viewed by more than 10 million people worldwide. Now, in her first book, Simard brings us into her world, the intimate world of the trees, in which she brilliantly illuminates the fascinating and vital truths–that trees are not simply the source of timber or pulp, but are a complicated, interdependent circle of life; that forests are social, cooperative creatures connected through underground networks by which trees communicate their vitality and vulnerabilities with communal lives not that different from our own.

BLOOMSBURY PICKS FOR APRIL

SUSAN, LINDA, NINA & COKIE
Lisa Napoli
In the years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, women in the workplace still found themselves relegated to secretarial positions or locked out of jobs entirely. This was especially true in the news business, a backwater of male chauvinism where a woman might be lucky to get a foothold on the “women’s pages.” But when a pioneering nonprofit called National Public Radio came along in the 1970s, and the door to serious journalism opened a crack, four remarkable women came along and blew it off the hinges.

GOLD DIGGERS
Sanjena Sathian
Gold Diggers is at once a sharply funny coming-of-age story and a brilliant satire on ambition and success and what it takes to “make it” in America. Sathian has written a novel of family, tradition, grief, love and acceptance, infusing her story with sly wit and so much wisdom. Utterly original and completely captivating! – Diana

NORTHERN SPY
Flynn Berry
Tessa Daly is a Belfast-bureau BBC producer, juggling the demands of her career and new motherhood. While the Good Friday Agreement was signed years ago, peace still feels fragile as the threat of violence persists in northern Ireland, leaving its citizens on edge. When Tessa learns that her sister has joined the IRA, she is incredulous. But as she learns more she begins to questions her own loyalties and ideals as she is gradually drawn into the conflict and forced to make a choice. But questions remain: who can she trust? Is she willing to endanger those she loves most? Northern Spy is twisty, page-turning suspense at its best! – Diana

BLOOMSBURY PICKS FOR MARCH

KLARA AND THE SUN
Kazuo Ishiguro
Klara and the Sun, the first novel by Kazuo Ishiguro since he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, tells the story of Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, who, from her place in the store, watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass on the street outside. She remains hopeful that a customer will soon choose her. Klara and the Sun is a thrilling book that offers a look at our changing world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator, and one that explores the fundamental question: what does it mean to love?

FOUR HUNDRED SOULS
Edited by Ibram X. Kendi
The story begins in 1619–a year before the Mayflower–when the White Lion disgorges “some 20-and-odd Negroes” onto the shores of Virginia, inaugurating the African presence in what would become the United States. It takes us to the present, when African Americans, descendants of those on the White Lion and a thousand other routes to this country, continue a journey defined by inhuman oppression, visionary struggles, stunning achievements, and millions of ordinary lives passing through extraordinary history. This collection of diverse pieces from ninety different minds reflecting ninety different perspectives unlocks the startling range of experiences and ideas that have always existed within the community of Blackness.

HOW TO AVOID A CLIMATE DISASTER
Bill Gates
Bill Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet’s slide to certain environmental disaster. In this book, he not only explains why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal.

THE COMMITTED
Viet Thanh Nguyen
The long-awaited follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Sympathizer, which has sold more than one million copies worldwide, The Committed follows the man of two minds as he arrives in Paris in the early 1980s with his blood brother Bon. The pair try to overcome their pasts and ensure their futures by engaging in capitalism in one of its purest forms: drug dealing. Both highly suspenseful and existential, The Committed is a blistering portrayal of commitment and betrayal that will cement Viet Thanh Nguyen’s position in the firmament of American letters.

OUR SUGGESTIONS FOR THESE TURBULENT TIMES

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A BIRD
David Allen Sibley
Doesn’t it feel like a consolation to have a truly magnificent spring during this season of fear and sickness? For the many people who are lucky enough to be able to go outside, there are birds – flying, nesting, eating and singing.
David Sibley, our foremost ornithologist, has written the bird book for birders and nonbirders alike – a treasure trove of stunning illustrations and extraordinary facts about what common and uncommon birds are doing – and why. It is the perfect family book.

THE SPLENDID AND THE VILE
Erik Larson
This is the book to lift your morale and make you remember that people have survived relentless horrors with courage and grace, inspired by the words and example of true leadership.
Larson turns history into an enthralling page turner as he chronicles how the British survived the Blitz, which killed over 40,000 civilians and destroyed over two million homes. According to Larson, Churchill taught the British people the “art of being fearless” as he held the country together and persuaded President Roosevelt that Britain was a worthy ally and willing to fight to the end.
This is also an intimate domestic drama of the Churchills, with Winston always at the core – dictating from his bathtub, with a cat under his arm and chomping a cigar, eccentrically and magnificently saving the world.

THE BOY, THE MOLE, THE FOX AND THE HORSE
Charles Mackesy
Charlie Mackesy offers inspiration and hope in uncertain times in this beautiful book, following the tale of a curious boy, a greedy mole, a wary fox and a wise horse who find themselves together in sometimes difficult terrain, sharing their greatest fears and biggest discoveries about vulnerability, kindness, hope, friendship and love. The shared adventures and important conversations between the four friends are full of life lessons that have connected with readers of all ages.

THE BOOKISH LIFE OF NINA HILL
Abbi Waxman
Nina Hill’s life may not seem like much, but for a person battling anxiety, it’s more than enough. She enjoys her job at a bookstore and her small circle of friends. Until a visit from a lawyer changes everything…The father that Nina never knew existed has died, leaving behind an enormous extended family. Nina now has innumerable sisters, brothers, nieces, nephews, and cousins all living within a twenty-mile radius all demanding her attention. If that’s not enough, Nina’s talent for worrying is taking the thrill out of falling in love. Tom, a fellow trivia nerd–who’s totally into her–is obviously too good to be true. Caught in a whirlwind of new people, emotions and experiences, she feels the need to protect herself. But maybe opening her world–and her heart–is a risk worth taking.

THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW
A. J. Finn
Anna Fox lives alone–a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

WHERE’D YOU GO BERNADETTE
Maria Semple
Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she’s a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she’s a disgrace; to design mavens, she’s a revolutionary architect; and to 15-year-old Bee, she is her best friend and, simply, Mom. Then Bernadette vanishes. It all began when Bee aced her report card and claimed her promised reward: a family trip to Antarctica. But Bernadette’s intensifying allergy to Seattle — and people in general — has made her so agoraphobic that a virtual assistant in India now runs her most basic errands. To find her mother, Bee compiles email messages, official documents, and secret correspondence — creating a compulsively readable and surprisingly touching novel about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter’s role in an absurd world.

FLORIDA
Lauren Groff
One of my favorite books of 2019. She confirms my belief that Florida is a weird, fantastical, all-American state. Lauren Groff is one of the best! – Sheila

 

                   

NOW IN PAPERBACK

HAMNET  A luminous portrait of a marriage, a shattering evocation of a family ravaged by grief and loss, and a tender and unforgettable re-imagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, and whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays of all time, Hamnet is mesmerizing, seductive, impossible to put down–a magnificent leap forward from one of our most gifted novelists.

THE SILENT PATIENT  Alicia Berenson’s life is seemingly perfect. A famous painter married to an in-demand fashion photographer, she lives in a grand house with big windows overlooking a park in one of London’s most desirable areas. One evening her husband Gabriel returns home late from a fashion shoot, and Alicia shoots him five times in the face, and then never speaks another word. Theo Faber is a criminal psychotherapist who has waited a long time for the opportunity to work with Alicia. His determination to get her to talk and unravel the mystery of why she shot her husband takes him down a twisting path into his own motivations–a search for the truth that threatens to consume him.

DEADLY EDUCATION  From the author of Uprooted and Spinning Silver comes the first book of the Scholomance trilogy, the story of an unwilling dark sorceress who is destined to rewrite the rules of magic. With flawless mastery, Naomi Novik creates a school bursting with magic like you’ve never seen before, and a heroine for the ages – a character so sharply realized and so richly nuanced that she will live on in hearts and minds for generations to come.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING  For years, rumors of the Marsh Girl have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.

BECOMING  In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her–from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it–in her own words and on her own terms.

SIMON THE FIDDLER  Bestselling author Paulette Jiles returns to Texas in this atmospheric story set at the end of the civil war about an itinerant fiddle player, a ragtag band of musicians with whom he travels trying to make a living, and the charming young Irish lass who steals his heart. Incandescent in its beauty, told in Jiles’s trademark spare yet lilting style, Simon the Fiddler is a captivating, bittersweet tale of the chances a devoted man will take, and the lengths he will go to fulfill his heart’s yearning.

THE BODY  Bill Bryson once again proves himself to be an incomparable companion as he guides us through the human body–how it functions, its remarkable ability to heal itself, and (unfortunately) the ways it can fail. Full of extraordinary facts (your body made a million red blood cells since you started reading this) and irresistible Brysonesque anecdotes, The Body will lead you to a deeper understanding of the miracle that is life in general and you in particular.

MINOR FEELINGS  Poet and essayist Cathy Park Hong fearlessly and provocatively blends memoir, cultural criticism, and history to expose fresh truths about racialized consciousness in America. Part memoir and part cultural criticism, this collection is vulnerable, humorous, and provocative–and its relentless and riveting pursuit of vital questions around family and friendship, art and politics, identity and individuality, will change the way you think about our world. Binding these essays together is Hong’s theory of “minor feelings.” As the daughter of Korean immigrants, Cathy Park Hong grew up steeped in shame, suspicion, and melancholy. She would later understand that these “minor feelings” occur when American optimism contradicts your own reality–when you believe the lies you’re told about your own racial identity. Minor feelings are not small, they’re dissonant–and in their tension Hong finds the key to the questions that haunt her.