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Home of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Specializing in contemporary fiction, children's books, young adult, local authors, & a large Shakespeare & theatre section.

After shopping, enjoy your book at... Bloomsbury Coffee House
Organic eats, drinks, treats
Above Bloomsbury Books @
290 E. Main
(541) 482-6112
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Virginia Woolf wants you!

Join the Bloomsbury Book Club!
Share your passion for books with like-minded people. Meets the 2nd Tuesday of each month, 7 pm on the Mezzanine at Bloomsbury Books. Limit: 25 participants.

In Honor of Taowhywee Agnes Baker Pilgrim

In Honor of Taowhywee Agnes Baker Pilgrim

grandmasayswakeuptheworldGRANDMA SAYS: WAKE UP, WORLD!
Agnes Baker Pilgrim
Agnes Baker Pilgrim, known to most as Grandma Aggie, is in her nineties and is the oldest living member of the Takelma Tribe, one of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz. A descendant of both spiritual and political tribal leaders, Grandma Aggie travels around the world to keep traditions alive, to help those in need and to be a voice for the voiceless, helping everyone to remember to preserve our Earth for animals and each other in a spiritual environment. Honored as a “Living Cultural Legend” by the Oregon Council of the Arts, Grandma Aggie relates childhood memories about her tribe and her life as a child growing up in an area that often didn’t allow Indians and dogs into public places, as well as contemporary issues such as bullying, teen suicide, drugs and alcohol, Pope Francis, President Obama, water conservation, climate change, and much more. Her stories will captivate you and provide a blueprint for how all the inhabitants of the earth can live together in harmony, spirituality, and peace.

 
empireofthesummermoonEMPIRE OF THE SUMMER MOON
S.C Gwynne
In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, this is a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between the Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. The book spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds and the arrival of the railroads a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a nine-year-old girl who was kidnapped by Comanches in 1836 and grew to love her captors, becoming the infamous White Squaw who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne s account is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told.

 

smellofrainondustTHE SMELL OF RAIN ON DUST
Martin Prechtel
Inspiring hope, solace, and courage in living through our losses, author Martin Prechtel, trained in the Tzutujil Maya shamanic tradition, shares profound insights on the relationship between grief and praise in our culture. He explores how the inability that many of us have to grieve and weep properly for the dead is deeply linked with the inability to give praise for living. In modern society, grief is something that we usually experience in private, alone, and without the support of a community. Prechtel explains that the unexpressed grief prevalent in our society today is the reason for many of the social, cultural, and individual maladies that we are currently experiencing. According to Prechtel, “When you have two centuries of people who have not properly grieved the things that they have lost, the grief shows up as ghosts that inhabit their grandchildren.” These “ghosts,” he says, can also manifest as disease in the form of tumors, which the Maya refer to as “solidified tears,” or in the form of behavioral issues and depression. He goes on to show how this collective, unexpressed energy is the long-held grief of our ancestors manifesting itself, and the work that can be done to liberate this energy so we can heal from the trauma of loss, war, and suffering. This “little book” can be seen as a companion of encouragement, a little extra light for those deep and noble parts in all of us.

 

thefirstoregoniansTHE FIRST OREGONIANS
Laura Berg, ed.
In 1991, the Oregon Council for the Humanities published The First Oregonians, the only single-volume, comprehensive history of Oregon’s Native Americans. A regional bestseller, this collaborative project between the council, Oregon tribes, and scholars served as an invaluable reference for teachers, scholars, and general-interest readers before it went out of print in 1996. Now revised and expanded for a new generation of Oregonians, The First Oregonians provides a comprehensive view of Oregon’s native peoples from the past to the present. In this remarkable volume, Oregon Indians tell their own stories, with more than half of the book’s chapters written by members of Oregon’s nine federally recognized tribes. Using oral histories and personal recollections, chapters examine lifeways and vividly depict not only a history of decimation and decline, but also a contemporary view of cultural revitalization, renewal, and continuity. The First Oregonians includes essays exploring geography, federal-Indian relations, language, and art written by prominent Northwest scholars. This new edition is richly illustrated with almost two hundred photographs, maps, and drawings. No other book offers as wide a variety of views and stories about the historical and contemporary experience of Oregon Indians. The First Oregonians is the definitive volume for all Oregonians interested in the fascinating story of Oregon’s first peoples.

 

blackelkspeaksBLACK ELK SPEAKS
John G. Neihardt
This story of the Oglala Lakota visionary and healer Nicholas Black Elk (1863 1950) and his people during momentous twilight years of the nineteenth century offers readers much more than a precious glimpse of a vanished time. Black Elk’s searing visions of the unity of humanity and Earth have made this book a classic that crosses multiple genres. Whether appreciated as the poignant tale of a Lakota life, as a history of a Native nation, or as an enduring spiritual testament, Black Elk Speaks is unforgettable. Black Elk met John G. Neihardt in 1930 on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota and asked Neihardt to share his story with the world. Neihardt understood and conveyed Black Elk’s experiences in this powerful and inspirational message for all humankind.