Staff Favorites

Staff Favorites

290 E. Main St
Ashland, OR 97520
541-488-0029
bloomsburyashland
@gmail.com

Open 7-days:
M-Fri 8:30am-9pm
Sat 9am-9pm
Sun 10am-6pm

Home of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival
Specializing in contemporary fiction, children’s books, young adult, local authors, & a large Shakespeare & theater section

After shopping, enjoy your book at… Bloomsbury Coffee House
Organic eats, drinks, treats
Above Bloomsbury Books.
290 E. Main
(541) 482-6112
More about
the cafe…

STAFF PICKS

 

Sheila           Karen              Anita             Greg             John            Brandon           Becky
Susan

 

LULLABY ROAD
James Anderson

“What becomes of the broken-hearted?” Sometimes, they become inhabitants of Lullaby Road, a stretch of highway 117 in the Utah desert, along which Ben Jones, a truck driver with his own damaged heart, makes deliveries. Ben has found a small Hispanic child, abandoned in the snow at a gas station with a note that reads, “Please, Ben, help my son. Big Trouble.” Ben takes the child with him in the truck–and there is big trouble. Lullaby Road is a well-plotted, satisfying mystery; but it is Anderson’s broken-yet-resilient characters, who have chosen–or were forced–to live in the lonely desert, who make it memorable. Ben Jones is a great modern protagonist–funny, compassionate, flawed and so human. The solitude and sere beauty of the landscape are always present and the descriptions of the flat vistas and endless horizons are haunting on James Anderson’s fine prose. –Sheila

 

THE HEART’S INVISIBLE FURIES
John Boyne

This heartbreakingly sad and laugh-aloud funny novel of Ireland is not to be missed. Cyril Avery is the adoptive son of eccentric twits, who consider themselves Irish aristocracy. His teenaged, pregnant birth mother was shamed and banished from her rural parish by a priest who had fathered two children of his own. Cyril’s story from 1945, when the Catholic church ruled with an iron hand, until 2015, when Ireland passed the Gay Marriage Act, is filled with meaningful, so-Irish characters, a tragic, repressive history and a droll wit, unseen in literature since Evelyn Waugh. Best novel of the year for me. –Sheila

 

 

THE STRANGER IN THE WOODS
Michael Finkel

A young man parks his car and disappears into the forest in Maine. For three decades he manages to survive through freezing winters with no contact from anyone. A fascinating true story of survival. –Karen

 

MANHATTAN BEACH
Jennifer Egan

Pulitzer prize-winning author Jennifer Egan paints a moving and captivating portrait of Brooklyn in the 1940s. The war is raging, people are experiencing hard times, and the New York mob is alive and well. Anna Kerrigan, an independent and capable young woman, is working in the parts department of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, supporting the war effort. But she is determined, against all odds, to be a professional diver who repairs vessels. When her father, who was working for the mob, suddenly disappears, Anna is ultimately driven to discover what has happened to him. While devoted to her mother and a severely, disabled sister, she fearlessly gets involved with the underworld to attempt to solve the mystery. Amidst a drastically changing world, Anna’s strength, resilience and passion create an extraordinary heroine. –Anita