Women’s Work by Megan K. Stack

Women’s Work by Megan K. Stack

When Stack gave birth to her son Max she left her prestigious job as a foreign correspondent to care for her newborn and to work on her novel. She discovered that, like birth, the experience of mothering a newborn can’t be anticipated. Despite the help of a full time nanny, instead of writing she was learning how to disappear. As time passed she began feeling her way first back into sanity, then her own skin, and the wider world. Then one child became two and her family relocated from China to India. Throughout the changes she reflected on the role of a nanny in her household. What must it be like to be a working mother, like herself, who leaves their child to go and care for another’s? Instead of reporting from a foreign war zone, Stack sends dispatches from the crossroads of domestic work and motherhood. Important. Compelling. WOMEN’S WORK is a study of motherhood, a work of cultural anthropology, a sociological argument, and a must read. -Becky