Welcome to Bloomsbury Books

An independent bookstore in downtown Ashland, Oregon


Bloomsbury Books, an independant bookstore since 1980, is located on Main Street in downtown Ashland, Oregon, home of the world-famous Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Specializing in contemporary fiction, children’s books, young adult, local authors and, of course, a large Shakespeare and theater section.

Bloomsbury Recommends

We hope you enjoy our favorite Bloomsbury Picks as much as we have!

  • The Light We Carry

    by Michelle Obama
    There may be no tidy solutions or pithy answers to life’s big challenges, but Michelle Obama believes that we can all locate and lean on a set of tools to help us better navigate change and remain steady within flux. In The Light We Carry, she opens a frank and honest dialogue with readers, considering the questions many of us wrestle with: How do we build enduring and honest relationships? How can we discover strength and community inside our differences? What tools do we use to address feelings of self-doubt or helplessness? What do we do when it all starts to feel like too much? In this inspiring follow-up to her critically acclaimed, #1 bestselling memoir Becomingformer First Lady Michelle Obama shares practical wisdom and powerful strategies for staying hopeful and balanced in today’s highly uncertain world.
  • Dickens and Prince

    by Nick Hornby
    Equipped with a fan’s admiration and his trademark humor and wit, Nick Hornby invites us into his latest obsession: the cosmic link between two unlikely artists, geniuses in their own rights, spanning race, class, and centuries—each of whom electrified their different disciplines and whose legacy resounded far beyond their own time. Examining the two artists’ personal tragedies, social statuses, boundless productivity, and other parallels, both humorous and haunting, Hornby shows how these two unlikely men from different centuries “lit up the world.” In the process, he creates a lively, stimulating rumination on the creativity, flamboyance, discipline, and soul it takes to produce great art.
  • The Cloisters

    by Katy Hays
    When Ann Stilwell arrives in New York City, she expects to spend her summer working as a curatorial associate at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Instead, she finds herself assigned to The Cloisters, a gothic museum and garden renowned for its medieval art collection and its group of enigmatic researchers studying the history of divination. Desperate to escape her painful past, Ann is happy to indulge the researchers’ more outlandish theories about the history of fortune telling. But what begins as academic curiosity quickly turns into obsession when Ann discovers a hidden 15th-century deck of tarot cards that might hold the key to predicting the future. When the dangerous game of power, seduction, and ambition at The Cloisters turns deadly, Ann becomes locked in a race for answers as the line between the arcane and the modern blurs. A haunting and magical blend of genres, The Cloisters is a gripping debut that will keep you on the edge of your seat.
  • Brown Girls

    by Daphne Palasi Andreades
    Welcome to Queens, New York, where streets echo with languages from all over the globe, subways rumble above dollar stores, trees bloom and topple over sidewalks, and the funky scent of the Atlantic Ocean wafts in from Rockaway Beach. Within one of New York City’s most vibrant and eclectic boroughs, young women of color like Nadira, Gabby, Naz, Trish, Angelique, and countless others, attempt to reconcile their immigrant backgrounds with the American culture in which they come of age. Here, they become friends for life—or so they vow. Exuberant and wild, together they roam The City That Never Sleeps, sing Mariah Carey at the tops of their lungs, yearn for crushes who pay them no mind—and break the hearts of those who do—all while trying to heed their mothers’ commands to be obedient daughters. But as they age, their paths diverge and rifts form between them, as some choose to remain on familiar streets, while others find themselves ascending in the world, beckoned by existences foreign and seemingly at odds with their humble roots.
  • Now Is Not the Time to Panic

    by Kevin Wilson
    An exuberant, bighearted novel about two teenage misfits who spectacularly collide one fateful summer, and the art they make that changes their lives forever. written with Kevin Wilson’s trademark wit and blazing prose, Now Is Not the Time to Panic is a nuanced exploration of young love, identity, and the power of art. It’s also about the secrets that haunt us—and, ultimately, what the truth will set free.
  • Signal Fires

    by Dani Shapiro
    Shapiro’s achingly beautiful novel centers on the Wilf and Shenkman families, neighbors on Division Street whose lives intersect in unexpected ways. At the story’s heart is Waldo Shenkman, the brilliant if misunderstood boy whose fascination with the night sky gives him an appreciation for the connectedness of all things. Heartbreaking yet filled with grace, this is a story of people making choices, keeping secrets, suffering through misunderstandings, yet ultimately finding a sense of connection in compassion. Gorgeously written, told with empathy and compassion, Signal Fires is not to be missed. – Diana
  • The Whalebone Theatre

    by Joanna Quinn
    When we first meet Christabel Seagrave, we know three things: it is the end of WWI, she is 3 years old, and she is a force to be reckoned with. Orphaned yet living on her family’s estate, she is mostly left to her own devices as she grows up exploring the seaside around her home, along with the books in the estate’s extensive library. An eccentric cast of characters come and go: Rosalind, her champagne-loving stepmother; Myrtle, the wealthy American “Poetess;” Taras, the Russian-expat artist; the mysterious intelligence officer, General Pennington, among others. But it is this bohemian upbringing that later prepares the intrepid Christabel to be an undercover British agent in Occupied France. The Whalebone Theatre is a coming of age story at its best: old-fashioned storytelling filled with humor, heartbreak and adventure, brimming with a wonderful cast of characters who feel so real. – Diana
  • We Spread

    by Iain Reid
    Penny has resigned herself to the mundane routine of old age, living in the apartment she has lived in for decades, surrounded by remnants of her past life with her deceased partner, and her former artistic aspirations. But Penny is deemed no longer fit to care for herself, and is sent to a facility that she supposedly picked out with her partner, though she has no memory of this. In this new place, in the cloud and comfort of being cared for, time, and identity, start to bleed. Is something sinister at play, or is Penny simply beginning fade away like all things eventually do. No one does delightful disorientation quite like Ian Reid. Inspired by his time caring for his mother, We Spread is a horrifying love letter to those with dementia, told with heart-wrenching empathy. – Skye
  • Sundial

    by Catriona Ward
    Rob’s childhood was not normal. It’s taken her years to carefully construct and curate a facade of normalcy, which she uses to protect her children in ways she never was. But you can’t protect your children from themselves. Her daughter Callie whispers to things that aren’t there, collects bones, and hurts her little sister with calculated apathy. In Callie, Rob sees the echoes of all the things she has worked so hard to leave behind. In an effort to avoid history repeating itself, Rob takes Callie to Sundial, her abandoned childhood home in the Mojave Desert. As Callie learns more about her mother, and the literal and figurative skeletons that are buried at Sundial, she can’t help but wonder if the true threat has always been Rob. Ward writes with the pace and insight of Stephen King, and the emotional depth and intelligence of Sally Rooney. A terrifying read you won’t be able to put down. – Skye & Liv
  • Love & Saffron

    by Kim Fay
    In 1962, Imogen is an established food columnist, documenting her life on a small island off the coast of Seattle, her decades long marriage with her husband, and recipes for the meals they share. Joan is just starting her writing career in LA, but has been reading Imogen’s column for years. On a whim, Joan sends Imogen a letter, containing a packet of saffron, and a recipe, and thus begins a “soul-deep” friendship. Though at completely different stages of their lives, and living at opposite ends of the West coast, the two women’s connection, and shared belief in the power of food, changes their lives in ways neither could ever have imagined. A witty and sweet testament to friendship and flavor. If you loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, you will love this book! –Skye

More Favorite Books

The Light We Carry

by Michelle Obama

Dickens and Prince

by Nick Hornby

The Cloisters

by Katy Hays

Brown Girls

by Daphne Palasi Andreades

Now Is Not the Time to Panic

by Kevin Wilson

Signal Fires

by Dani Shapiro

The Passenger

by Cormac McCarthy

The Boys from Biloxi

by John Grisham

The Last Chairlift

by John Irving

The Marriage Portrait

by Maggie O’Farrell

Our Missing Hearts

by Celeste Ng

Liberation Day: Stories

by George Saunders

The Whalebone Theatre

by Joanna Quinn

We Spread

by Iain Reid

Demon Copperhead

by Barbara Kingsolver

All’s Well

by Mona Awad

How High We Go In the Dark

by Sequoia Nagamatsu

Sundial

by Catriona Ward

Love & Saffron

by Kim Fay

What Strange Paradise

by Omar El Akkad

The Froggies Do NOT Want To Sleep

by Adam Gustavson

I Kissed Shara Wheeler

by Casey McQuiston

The Girl from the Sea: A Graphic Novel

by Molly Knox Osterman

A Wolf Called Wander

by Rosanne Parry

Taylor Before and After

by Jennie Englund

Everywhere Babies

by Susan Meyers

Revelator

by Daryl Gregory

Should We Stay Or Should We Go

Harlem Shuffle

by Colson Whitehead

Knight Owl

by Christopher Denise

Featured Titles

Below are some of our currently featured titles available at Bloomsbury Books.

  • The Light We Carry

    by Michelle Obama
    There may be no tidy solutions or pithy answers to life’s big challenges, but Michelle Obama believes that we can all locate and lean on a set of tools to help us better navigate change and remain steady within flux. In The Light We Carry, she opens a frank and honest dialogue with readers, considering the questions many of us wrestle with: How do we build enduring and honest relationships? How can we discover strength and community inside our differences? What tools do we use to address feelings of self-doubt or helplessness? What do we do when it all starts to feel like too much? In this inspiring follow-up to her critically acclaimed, #1 bestselling memoir Becomingformer First Lady Michelle Obama shares practical wisdom and powerful strategies for staying hopeful and balanced in today’s highly uncertain world.
  • Dickens and Prince

    by Nick Hornby
    Equipped with a fan’s admiration and his trademark humor and wit, Nick Hornby invites us into his latest obsession: the cosmic link between two unlikely artists, geniuses in their own rights, spanning race, class, and centuries—each of whom electrified their different disciplines and whose legacy resounded far beyond their own time. Examining the two artists’ personal tragedies, social statuses, boundless productivity, and other parallels, both humorous and haunting, Hornby shows how these two unlikely men from different centuries “lit up the world.” In the process, he creates a lively, stimulating rumination on the creativity, flamboyance, discipline, and soul it takes to produce great art.
  • Now Is Not the Time to Panic

    by Kevin Wilson
    An exuberant, bighearted novel about two teenage misfits who spectacularly collide one fateful summer, and the art they make that changes their lives forever. written with Kevin Wilson’s trademark wit and blazing prose, Now Is Not the Time to Panic is a nuanced exploration of young love, identity, and the power of art. It’s also about the secrets that haunt us—and, ultimately, what the truth will set free.
  • Demon Copperhead

    by Barbara Kingsolver
    A retelling of the classic Dickens novel David Copperfield, Demon Copperhead is set in the mountains of southern Appalachia. It’s the story of a boy born to a teenaged single mother in a single-wide trailer, with no assets beyond his dead father’s good looks and copper-colored hair, a caustic wit, and a fierce talent for survival. In a plot that never pauses for breath, relayed in his own unsparing voice, he braves the modern perils of foster care, child labor, derelict schools, athletic success, addiction, disastrous loves, and crushing losses. Through all of it, he reckons with his own invisibility in a popular culture where even the superheroes have abandoned rural people in favor of cities.
  • When We Were Birds by Ayanna Lloyd Banwo

    When We Were Birds

    by Ayanna Lloyd Banwo
    Port Angeles, Trinidad. Darwin has reluctantly, painfully gone against the beliefs of his Rastafarian family and taken up work as a grave digger. He is adrift in a city alone, his past abandoned. Morne Marie, Trinidad. Yejide stands at the bedside of her dying mother – next to the ghost of her mother’s twin. In every generation of St. Bernard women, there is one who must escort the dead to the afterlife. Yejide inherits this legacy…and she must decide how to reckon with her fate. Darwin and Yejide’s lives thread together when they meet in Fidelis, the old cemetery where Darwin works. Ayanna Lloyd Banwo’s debut novel is image-rich, driven by familial obligation and love, relentlessly magical – and her voice is strong. This is a love story of mythic proportions. – Liv
  • Ordinary Monsters by J.M. Miro

    Ordinary Monsters

    by J.M. Miro
    Victorian London. Moody cobblestone streets beset by constant rain. Two teens, from vastly different backgrounds, have two things in common: they both have mysterious abilities, and are hiding from a man made of shadow. This is a gritty supernatural tale of intrigue that will thrill fantasy and mystery lovers alike. – Dom 
  • The Daughter of Doctor Moreau - Silvia Moreno Garcia

    The Daughter of Doctor Moreau

    by Silvia Moreno Garcia
    Which is more monstrous: the creation of life, or the exploitation of it? This reimagining of the classic novel is set in the Yucatan, and centers on Carlota, the beautiful and sheltered daughter of the titular doctor. The “monsters” her father has created are all Carlota has ever known. They are her friends, and her family, as natural as the land itself. But the handsome young son of her father’s patron thinks differently, and views Carlota differently. The hybrids, and Carlota herself, are objects to display, trade, and use. Unfortunately, nature does not like to be controlled. Moreno spins this story on its head, and examines the devastating effects of colonialism, sexism, and racism with gut wrenching accuracy.
  • This Time Tomorrow - Emma Straub

    This Time Tomorrow

    by Emma Straub
    What if you woke up one morning and found yourself back in high school? The day she is supposed to turn 40, this is exactly where Alice finds herself, transported back in time to her 16th birthday. How Alice uses her adult life experience to reexamine her younger self, her choices, and most importantly, her connection with her father, is the winning heart of this sweet and funny novel. Told with such warmth and kindness, this is Emma Straub at her absolute best!
  • Bomb Shelter - Mary Laura Philpott

    Bomb Shelter

    by Mary Laura Philpott
    Mary Laura Philpott, author of I Miss You When I Blink, returns with a beautiful memoir that meanders and weaves through the wilds of being a person. Philpott examines our true relationship to media— how it comforts us in bizarre little ways. She travers the scope of our attachment to the weird little living things around us. She finds fantastic throughlines to tie stories together and picks just the perfect, most hilarious and most painful anecdotes to explain her relationship to the world around her. The result is a true marvel of humor and hope. – Liv
  • The Last White Man - Mohsin Hamid

    The Last White Man

    by Mohsin Hamid
    Mohsin Hamid’s gift for exploring deep and complex issues in original ways is on full display with The Last White Man. Anders wakes up one morning to find that his skin has turned dark. At first, as he navigates this new self, he only tells his girlfriend, Oona. As reports of similar transformations around the land become more and more frequent, Anders reveals himself to family and friends, forcing everyone to grapple with old prejudices as they reexamine their relationships with one another. The brilliance of this book is the way in which Hamid explores a full range of human emotions as he brings his characters together, envisioning a hopeful future of empathy and understanding.

Cafe

After shopping, enjoy organic coffee, food, beer and wine upstairs at Bloomsbury Blends.

Bloomsbury Blends Coffeehouse

Order / Check Stock

Interested in ordering a book or checking our stock?
Give us a call during store hours at 541-488-0029 or use the link below.

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290 E. Main Street
Ashland, OR 97520
541-488-0029

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